Events

Dr. Nicole Avena Cork

When Food Becomes The Enemy: Linking Overeating, Obesity & Other Food Addictions

Course Outline

Many of us struggle to maintain a healthy body weight. Most individuals who are overweight, find it difficult to lose weight and keep it off long term. While there are many different reasons why people can become overweight or obese, overeating is clearly a leading cause.

But, why do people overeat? And why do people typically opt to overeat foods that are high in calories and not very nutrient dense, like cookies and chips, as opposed to fruits and vegetables?

One reason why people may overeat, that has become of great interest, has to do with the hedonic (or pleasure) properties of our foods. Our modern food environment has changed in many ways. Not only are we now much more reliant on the use of processed foods, but we are also eating more foods with added sugars and fats. New research suggests that processed foods and additives, like sugars, fats and artificial sweeteners, can result in behavioural changes that resemble an addiction, and this can subsequently lead to a vicious cycle of overeating that is often coupled with dieting attempts, guilt, distress and depression.

These addiction-like eating behaviours include bingeing, feelings of “withdrawal” with trying to abstain from processed food, and craving of foods, especially carbohydrates, which can contribute to more overeating and further perpetuate the addiction.

Excessive eating of highly-processed foods is also associated with changes in the brain which responds in a way that is similar to the effects seen when using a drug, like heroin or cocaine. Brain changes include alterations in neurotransmitters release, neurotransmitter receptor sensitivity and even gene expression. Research also suggests that initial exposures to processed foods, during pregnancy and in early life, can have a long-term impact on the development of addictions. Further, excessive exposure to highly-processed foods early in life is associated with obesity later on, as well as a preference for high-fat foods.

This course will review the science of food addiction, and how it manifests in utero, children and adults. It will also offer guidelines on how to mitigate food addiction, and how to recognize and replace foods in one’s diet that can promote addictive overeating.

Learning Objectives:

  • To understand the biological basis of addictions
  • To review our modern food environment in terms of the types of foods typically available and consumed
  • To analyze differences between foods and drugs in terms of how we view them psychologically and socially
  • To understand how exposure to certain types of foods early in life can have an impact on brain development and behaviours
  • To review the empirical research studies on food addiction
  • To apply information regarding methods to recognize and reduce added sugars in one’s diet

About the Speaker: Dr. Nicole Avena

Dr. Nicole Avena is a research neuroscientist and expert in the fields of nutrition, diet and addiction. She is a pioneer in the field of food addiction, and it was her seminal research work that jump-started this exciting new field of exploration in medicine and nutrition. She is also an expert in diet during pregnancy, and childhood nutrition.

Dr. Avena received a Ph.D. in Psychology and Neuroscience from Princeton University in 2006. She then completed her postdoctoral fellowship in 2010 at the prestigious Rockefeller University in New York City, an all-research institution that lays claim to having had 24 Nobel Prize winners on its staff over the years.
Dr. Avena presently is Assistant Professor of Neuroscience at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City and a Visiting Professor in Health Psychology at Princeton University. She has published over 90 scholarly journal articles on topics related to diet, nutrition and overeating, and she frequently presents her research findings at scientific conferences and University symposia. Her research achievements have been honoured by awards from several groups including the New York Academy of Sciences, the American Psychological Association, and the National Institute on Drug Abuse. She has received research funding from prestigious sources, including the National Institutes of Health and the National Eating Disorders Association.

Dr. Avena’s book, Why Diets Fail (2014, Ten Speed Press) reviews the research on food addiction and provides a way in which people can remove added sugars and carbohydrates from their diet. She has another best-selling book, What to Eat When You’re Pregnant (2015, Ten Speed Press) that provides moms-to-be with nutritional advice on what to eat to ensure they and their baby are healthy. Her latest book, What to Feed Your Baby and Toddler (2018), covers nutrition for babies who are just beginning to eat and offers science-based advice and practical tips on how to get your baby to eat healthy foods, like vegetables.

Dr. Avena is a sought-after speaker, and she has been lauded by her colleagues and the public for her ability to explain complex scientific principles and research findings to a lay audience. Dr. Avena regularly makes public speaking appearances to discuss her research and discoveries throughout the United States, Europe and Asia. She is regularly asked to speak to special-interest groups, industry groups, and schools. She regularly appears on the Dr. Oz Show, and she has also appeared on The Doctors, Good Day NY, Home and Family, and CNN, as well as many local news programs including FOX5 San Diego, KTLA, WGN, and the local NY stations. She has also been a guest on several radio programs and podcasts and has been filmed for several documentaries on the obesity epidemic. Her work has been featured on the cover of National Geographic (Sept ’17), as well as in Time Magazine, Bloomberg Business Week, The New York Times, Shape, Men’s Health, Details, and many other periodicals. Dr. Avena is a member of the Random House Speakers Bureau. She has a TED-ED talk, How Sugar Affects Your Brain, was ranked #2 most watched. Her video has been praised by educators and public health groups. She consults for many policy groups, pharmaceutical companies and baby-food manufacturers.

Dr. Avena has a blog on Psychology Today called Food Junkie, which explains relevant research findings in an accessible way. She also blogs for The Huffington Post. You can also follow her on Twitter or Facebook.

Dr. Nicole Avena Cork

When Food Becomes The Enemy: Linking Overeating, Obesity & Other Food Addictions

Course Outline

Many of us struggle to maintain a healthy body weight. Most individuals who are overweight, find it difficult to lose weight and keep it off long term. While there are many different reasons why people can become overweight or obese, overeating is clearly a leading cause.

But, why do people overeat? And why do people typically opt to overeat foods that are high in calories and not very nutrient dense, like cookies and chips, as opposed to fruits and vegetables?

One reason why people may overeat, that has become of great interest, has to do with the hedonic (or pleasure) properties of our foods. Our modern food environment has changed in many ways. Not only are we now much more reliant on the use of processed foods, but we are also eating more foods with added sugars and fats. New research suggests that processed foods and additives, like sugars, fats and artificial sweeteners, can result in behavioural changes that resemble an addiction, and this can subsequently lead to a vicious cycle of overeating that is often coupled with dieting attempts, guilt, distress and depression.

These addiction-like eating behaviours include bingeing, feelings of “withdrawal” with trying to abstain from processed food, and craving of foods, especially carbohydrates, which can contribute to more overeating and further perpetuate the addiction.

Excessive eating of highly-processed foods is also associated with changes in the brain which responds in a way that is similar to the effects seen when using a drug, like heroin or cocaine. Brain changes include alterations in neurotransmitters release, neurotransmitter receptor sensitivity and even gene expression. Research also suggests that initial exposures to processed foods, during pregnancy and in early life, can have a long-term impact on the development of addictions. Further, excessive exposure to highly-processed foods early in life is associated with obesity later on, as well as a preference for high-fat foods.

This course will review the science of food addiction, and how it manifests in utero, children and adults. It will also offer guidelines on how to mitigate food addiction, and how to recognize and replace foods in one’s diet that can promote addictive overeating.

Learning Objectives:

  • To understand the biological basis of addictions
  • To review our modern food environment in terms of the types of foods typically available and consumed
  • To analyze differences between foods and drugs in terms of how we view them psychologically and socially
  • To understand how exposure to certain types of foods early in life can have an impact on brain development and behaviours
  • To review the empirical research studies on food addiction
  • To apply information regarding methods to recognize and reduce added sugars in one’s diet

About the Speaker: Dr. Nicole Avena

Dr. Nicole Avena is a research neuroscientist and expert in the fields of nutrition, diet and addiction. She is a pioneer in the field of food addiction, and it was her seminal research work that jump-started this exciting new field of exploration in medicine and nutrition. She is also an expert in diet during pregnancy, and childhood nutrition.

Dr. Avena received a Ph.D. in Psychology and Neuroscience from Princeton University in 2006. She then completed her postdoctoral fellowship in 2010 at the prestigious Rockefeller University in New York City, an all-research institution that lays claim to having had 24 Nobel Prize winners on its staff over the years.
Dr. Avena presently is Assistant Professor of Neuroscience at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City and a Visiting Professor in Health Psychology at Princeton University. She has published over 90 scholarly journal articles on topics related to diet, nutrition and overeating, and she frequently presents her research findings at scientific conferences and University symposia. Her research achievements have been honoured by awards from several groups including the New York Academy of Sciences, the American Psychological Association, and the National Institute on Drug Abuse. She has received research funding from prestigious sources, including the National Institutes of Health and the National Eating Disorders Association.

Dr. Avena’s book, Why Diets Fail (2014, Ten Speed Press) reviews the research on food addiction and provides a way in which people can remove added sugars and carbohydrates from their diet. She has another best-selling book, What to Eat When You’re Pregnant (2015, Ten Speed Press) that provides moms-to-be with nutritional advice on what to eat to ensure they and their baby are healthy. Her latest book, What to Feed Your Baby and Toddler (2018), covers nutrition for babies who are just beginning to eat and offers science-based advice and practical tips on how to get your baby to eat healthy foods, like vegetables.

Dr. Avena is a sought-after speaker, and she has been lauded by her colleagues and the public for her ability to explain complex scientific principles and research findings to a lay audience. Dr. Avena regularly makes public speaking appearances to discuss her research and discoveries throughout the United States, Europe and Asia. She is regularly asked to speak to special-interest groups, industry groups, and schools. She regularly appears on the Dr. Oz Show, and she has also appeared on The Doctors, Good Day NY, Home and Family, and CNN, as well as many local news programs including FOX5 San Diego, KTLA, WGN, and the local NY stations. She has also been a guest on several radio programs and podcasts and has been filmed for several documentaries on the obesity epidemic. Her work has been featured on the cover of National Geographic (Sept ’17), as well as in Time Magazine, Bloomberg Business Week, The New York Times, Shape, Men’s Health, Details, and many other periodicals. Dr. Avena is a member of the Random House Speakers Bureau. She has a TED-ED talk, How Sugar Affects Your Brain, was ranked #2 most watched. Her video has been praised by educators and public health groups. She consults for many policy groups, pharmaceutical companies and baby-food manufacturers.

Dr. Avena has a blog on Psychology Today called Food Junkie, which explains relevant research findings in an accessible way. She also blogs for The Huffington Post. You can also follow her on Twitter or Facebook.

Autism, Anxiety & the A.R.T. of Body Cognition – Holly Bridges

Course Proposition

So much of traditional autism therapy is devoted to removing variances and aligning with the typical. What if this is a false benchmark against which we judge those on the autism spectrum?

Reframing autism is about celebrating diversity. It is tapping into the innate intelligence, brilliance and creativity of enhanced perception – a field that people on the spectrum often inhabit – and then helping people to make the most of their gifts.

The artfulness of this technique is in creatively working with the person to balance the need for safety vs the need for growth; helping each person to both discover and witness their potential. When we show that we are re-educating the body, those on the spectrum are quickly able to connect with this truth and become motivated to grow.

People learn to reconnect through a process of self-discovery. They begin to feel empowered and all manner of things become possible spontaneously. The A.R.T approach helps them to discover how to apply and sustain this.

Course Outline

The 2-day course will equip attendees with a basic grounding in The Autism Reframe Technique.

It will explore the new therapeutic outcomes that may be realised when physical therapy is combined with cutting-edge neuroscience and psychology.

The course comprises foundation theory, evidence & research and examples of practical exercises structured around Case Histories in Australia, Europe and The USA.

An optional third day will focus upon the practical implementation of A.R.T.

Day 1 + 2

Will explore the new therapeutic outcomes that may be realised when physical therapy is combined with cutting-edge neuroscience, psychology and neurodivergent thinking.

Day 3 ( Optional ) : A.R.T. – Beyond the fundamentals

***Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Days 1 & 2***

Is designed for people who want to apply A.R.T. therapeutically. It is a chance to learn the exercises outlined in Days 1 & 2 in greater detail and depth.

It facilitates an intimate understanding of A.R.T. and provides a hands-on opportunity to see how A.R.T. is applied in a wide variety of circumstance, by learning directly from Holly. It is an opportunity to frame questions and tailor your learning.

Name of course:  A.R.T. – beyond the fundamentals: How to achieve and sustain Body Cognition

Duration:  8 Hours 

Course Delivery:  Training Workshop

This workshop is designed for people who want to apply A.R.T. therapeutically. It is a chance to learn the exercises outlined in Days 1 & 2 in greater detail and depth.

Day 3 facilitates an intimate understanding of A.R.T. and provides a hands-on opportunity to see how A.R.T. is applied in a wide variety of circumstance, by learning directly from Holly. 

  • Learn how the nervous system impacts autism, how to reduce sensory overload and how to gain greater mental clarity, through working with the vagus nerve.
  • Learn how to improve vagal tone, with intelligence and safety.

There is nothing quite like this anywhere in the world. It is an opportunity to connect with this new paradigm of therapy and to learn tools for yourselves, your clients and your loved ones. 

A lot of good can happen when we let down our preconceived ideas about what normal is and ‘should be’. When we do this we are truly present to the people we work with. 

The focus is on how we support growth and change through appreciating and working with neurodiversity. 

Useful for professionals, therapists, support workers, parents and people on the spectrum. 

Ideal for Professionals looking to progress to become an A.R.T. therapist.

 

 

Learning Outcomes

  • Reframing the paradigm of autism
  • The role of the history of autism and autism research in shaping  current therapeutic practice
  • The Polyvagal Theory: how the body impacts autism
  • A working model of the Polyvagal Theory – how to make the PVT accessible to clients + families
  • The physical aspects of anxiety and stress and how they impact our physical and mental health
  • A practical understanding of the complex interrelationship between the gut, brain, vestibular and limbic system and how this determines our sense of self.
  • Principles of brain plasticity and how to apply in a therapeutic setting
  • Principles of co-design and how to apply in a therapeutic setting
  • How expectation in general autism therapy leads to a ‘glass ceiling’ and failure for the client
  • Conceptualising a new paradigm of therapy for ASD: what it can look like
  • The principles of body cognition and interception and how they apply to ASD
  • How to work with ASD and interoception somatically – the 80/20 rule
  • Somatic tools to apply clinically
  • Knowledge of the therapeutic possibilities with a wider appreciation of autism
  • Autism Reframe Technique

Core Elements

  • Reframing: Exploring autism from a different perspective; shifting from a myopic ‘deficit’ model – what people with autism can’t do – to one that explores and believes in the creative and intellectual potential of each individual
  • The Polyvagal Theory: The vagus nerve responds to our internal and external needs and takes us into a flight/fight state but can also take us into an involuntary shut-down immobilized state. Autism/Asperger is a physical response the body has that is a little out of our control that has nothing to do with intelligence.
  • Neuroception: PVT is based on the principle of neuroception, that ‘The body has a complex network of information gathering that alerts us to safety and danger.’
  • Brain Plasticity: The brain’s ability to respond and rewire – at any age. Tapping into the innate intelligence of the mind/body. Realizing self-capacity and self-belief. 
  • Neurodiversity – appreciating the enhanced perception and highly individual nature of people on the autism spectrum. Instead of seeing deficit, we see nuance and advanced ways of seeing andperceivingg. By adopting a more complex and intricate paradigm of autism we reframe it from something we need to ‘fix’ to something we can explore.
  • Unlearning: Ending top-down models of therapy and seeing that the client is at the front and centre of the process.
  • Codesign: Codesign is a fluid process and not a destination. It is opening our vision; collaboration vs coercion; possibility vs deficit

Holly Bridges

Holly is a therapist, keynote speaker and is the author of the internationally acclaimed book, ‘Reframe Your Thinking Around Autism’. Since writing the book Holly has developed her Autism Reframe Therapy program (A.R.T) which incorporates the principles of co-design and brain plasticity, and she works with families and practitioners, teaching techniques to restore connection between the brain and nervous system.

Holly has had a lifelong passion for working with the body/mind and she thrives on making complex psychology simple and available to people. This impulse to simplify and convey has taken her on a vast journey where she is now a leading light in autism therapy.

Through her critically acclaimed book, Holly has helped thousands of parents, autists, educators and therapists perceive a more positive and helpful way of perceiving autism, and she has affected hundreds of families from the severely challenged and non-verbal, to adults with Asperger’s, right through to the very young with her simple and effective A.R.T. techniques.

 

 

Resynch Your Psychology – Steven Hoskinson

Resynch Your Psychology – Steven Hoskinson [ Dublin ]

Overview

Steven Hoskinson has trained trauma therapists for nearly 20 years. Trained in clinical psychology, he founded Organic Intelligence® to complement traditional therapies for people whose bodies, minds and emotions are in distress.

How we try to help depends on how we frame ‘what’s wrong’.  In fact, the focus on ‘what’s wrong’, is the essence of the problem. More Importantly, what’s the solution? Simply Resynch our psychology. In these two days, we will shift our understanding of trauma to see trauma as a physiology out of synch.

The value here is that our biology is fully capable and wants to reorganize (re-synchronize) and under the right conditions, it can. But it is waiting for us to listen to the emotions, the images, the thoughts, the stories and the sensations that are intended by Nature to restore balance, to heal…

Together we will learn the distinct phases of a system from chaos to self-organization, and learn the tools of reorganization— both innate and therapist supplied. Let’s explore together what’s meant by the biology’s “initial conditions” for self-organization:

  • Connecting to the environment using the senses
  • Orientation to Pleasure (Remember pleasure is the currency of Connection)
  • Stabilizing Blue

Copyright: Steven Hoskinson

Learning Outcomes

1) Participants will be able to describe implicit motor patterns as they offer just enough intensity to increase threshold tolerance.

2) Participants will be able to use orientation exercises with clients to enhance stabilization.

3) Participants will be able to describe salient differences between positive and negative reinforcement and describe why it might matter in therapy.

4) Participants will be able to find and describe fractals and self-similarity.

5) Participants will be able to better recognize and reinforce spontaneous self-organizing client behaviours, emotions, thoughts, sensations, and images.

6) Participants will be able to describe some theoretical relationships between trauma and biological mis-synchrony, and the disruption of circadian rhythmicity.

7) Participants will be able to use the modulation of focused attention and reinforce integrative states, taking advantage of the brain’s operation in its Default Mode.

8) Participants will gain an appreciation for complexity science and the necessity of its understanding for lasting therapeutic gains.

Optional EXTRA Demo Day In Dublin On The 21st March

In this day, together participants will have the opportunity to experience the wonder of our natural unfoldment. Deep attunement to the self-organizing system— our human biology—will show us the way. Organic Intelligence finds the client’s natural path of evolution and meaning through experiencing the very human pathways of meaning and pleasure. This day is a favourite among OI aficionados, and of Steve, as we come together to support, to learn, and to share the experience of embodying the authentic beauty and pathos of our human nature. Participants will learn why the OI koan is: “trauma means unintegrated resource”.  Our intention is kindness, our nature is compassion, and our OI mantra is “the job is enjoyment”.  Tune in to Steve’s OI Podcast, “The End of Trauma” at  https://endoftrauma.org, and on iTunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-end-of-trauma/id1436230297?mt=2&ls=1]

About Steven Hoskinson

Steven Hoskinson, MA, MAT, is President of Hoskinson Consulting and Founder, CEO and Chief Compassion Officer (CCO) of Organic Intelligence® and the 501(c)(3) nonprofit Organic Intelligence Outreach Institute. Steve developed the Human Empowerment And Resiliency Training — HEARTraining® — based on Organic Intelligence, which is a positive psychology, fractal method to resolve the devastating effects of stress, trauma, and PTSD. Mindfulness-based, it is used around the world by therapists, bodyworkers, social workers and those engaged in the interpersonal neurobiology, resiliency and recovery fields.Steven Hoskinson

Starting in 1999, Steven Hoskinson has trained thousands of therapists, bodyworkers, and social workers in North America, Europe, Asia, and the Middle East in the art of trauma resolution. As a leader in the Somatic Psychology field, Steve worked as International Training Faculty for the Peter Levine’s Somatic Experiencing® Trauma Institute for 17 years and is currently Adjunct Faculty for JFK University’s Somatic Psychology program.

In 2007 Steve established Hoskinson Consulting, Inc. in San Diego, CA. He has graduate degrees in Theology and Psychology. Steve is a founding member of the International Transformational Resilience Coalition and the Northern California Society for Integrative Mental Health.

Steve is the Executive Producer of Hindu Lunch Box by Turkish alternative group Powerdrunk.

For a more complete biography and lineage visit Steve Hoskinson’s biography page on the Organic Intelligence website.

Hoskinson Consulting Video Library

The Haunted Self: Understanding and Treating Trauma-Generated Dissociation – Onno van der Hart, PhD

The Haunted Self: Understanding and Treating Trauma-Generated Dissociation, With an Emphasis on Working With Dissociative Parts

Traumatic experiences can be regarded as breaking-points, dividing one’s personality into dissociative parts functioning in daily life (ANPs) and dissociative parts stuck in trauma-time (EPs). The earlier in life the traumatization—often involving Attachment/Developmental trauma, inherent in emotional, physical and sexual abuse–starts, and the more intense and frequent it is, the more complex this dissociation of the personality becomes, then the more phase-oriented therapy needs to be, aiming at increasing the patient’s/client’s integrative capacity. In principle, phase-oriented treatment consists of three recurring phases:

(1) stabilization, symptom reduction and skills training; (2) treatment of traumatic memories; and (3) personality (re-)integration and rehabilitation. Such therapy needs to include: a clearly-defined collaborative therapeutic relationship; a systematic plan of overcoming the various phobias which maintain the dissociation of the personality; the thoughtful application of a systems approach, involving working with dissociative parts—also in the treatment of the traumatic memories. This workshop highlights, in particular, the challenges of working with dissociative parts.

The workshop is an exploration of the many ‘mysterious’ questions that arise when working using a ‘parts’ lense. The two days will tease out some of the following questions:

1) How many ‘dissociative parts’ are clients/therapists likely to experience, what is useful when clients seem to have a vast array of inner personalities?

2) What specific exercises/interventions might foster relationships between a client and his ‘parts’

3) Clients/Therapists often speak about ‘parts’ in the therapeutic hour, they often give a ‘commentary’, but when asked to connect with a part in the here and now, have great difficulty doing so. What might be helpful here?

4) Some Therapists/clients, having connected with a part in the therapy hour, often talk about building a relationship with a part during the following week,
Yet week on week nothing happens. What could we do here?

5) What is useful to brings parts into the here and now, so that clients can stop being triggered

6) Are there differences in working with early rupture/Developmental Trauma versus Complex PTSD using the ‘parts’ model? If so, what are they?

Learning outcomes

Participants will be able to:

  1. Understand the nature of trauma-generated dissociation of the personality as an extreme form of non-realization
  2. Recognize the basic division between apparently normal dissociative parts (ANPs) and emotional parts (EPs) and understand the survival roles of various dissociative parts within the context of patient’s/client’s personality
  3. Understand how various phobias maintain the dissociation of the personality and knowing how to overcome them with the frame of phase-oriented treatment
  4. Know how to utilize the collaborative therapeutic relationship in helping the patient/client to recognize, accept, and collaborate with parts
  5. Develop a systemic approach in working with these parts, including child parts (also pre-verbal parts), hostile and perpetrator-imitating parts, perpetrator-idealizing parts
  6. Use therapeutic approaches that call upon the patient’s/client’s imaginative capacity
  7. Enlist dissociative parts’ specific collaboration in the challenging work of integrating traumatic memories

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Bio:

Onno van der Hart, PhD, is Emeritus Professor of Psychopathology of Chronic Traumatization at Utrecht University, the Netherlands, and a psychologist/ psychotherapist in private practice, Amstelveen, the Netherlands. He acts as a consultant and supervisor in the field of trauma-related dissociation. He is a past president of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies (ISTSS) and the recipient of a number of awards for his clinical and

Embodied Self-Experience with Licia Sky & Special Guest, Bessel van der Kolk

Important Notice

At present this workshop is only available to those who will have completed the Two-day seminar with Bessel van der Kolk on the 29th & 30th. Spaces are limited so please book early to avoid disappointment

 

This is a unique opportunity to attend A One-day Experiential Workshop that will capture and bring to life Bessel van der Kolk two day seminar on the 29th & 30th. It’s an embodied felt sense of Bessel’s work

A one-day experiential follow-up to the Two-day lecture that Bessel teaches. The exercises and discussions will illustrate much of the neurobiology Bessel teaches, it is a day on how to move from the research to the clinical application of his findings, based on both Licia’s and Bessel’s upcoming book, The Body Keeps The Score Workbook

The latest neuro-scientific research has shown that how we experience our bodies impacts how we process sensations and memories, and how we heal from traumatic experiences.

Verbally oriented therapists may wonder how this knowledge can be applied to bring an embodied approach to therapeutic sessions. From the moments before a session starts, to the first moments that a therapist meets a client, what is happening from an interpersonal neurobiological perspective, and how can that awareness and information inform the process of the session?

As therapists, our own body awareness is the barometer we use to track the states of both the patient and our self within the session. We will discuss and demonstrate how this awareness affects the container—the safety and ability to be present with what emerges within the session.

In this workshop, Licia Sky, co-author of the Body Keeps the Score Workbook, will offer experiential exercises drawn from theatre, meditation, yoga, bodywork, and Embodied Voice.

Participants will be guided through awareness experiences and reflective discussion of what we notice taking place within each exercise, with the goal of integrating an embodied orientation into clinical practice.  

  • Meditation for body awareness in stillness – breath, tensions, alignment, etc
  • Movement –self and body awareness in space
  • Walking, walking in parts, walking in pairs
  • Check-in & feedback – noticing what happens
  • Proximity walk,
  • Energy, guided safe touch
  • Check-in & feedback – noticing what happens
  • Gestures, poses, Story Sculptures
  • Healing sculptures tableaus
  • Check-in & feedback – noticing what happens

Case studies and discussion to conclude the day.

 

Schedule

9:00-9:45 am Introduction on neuroscience of self-experience, filtering systems, states of being, cerebellar activity. Setting the context for the scaffold of enhanced non-verbal awareness exercises for the day.

9:45-10:45 am Stillness and silence— Slowing and quieting for tracking the body sensations and stimuli we habitually filter out.

Writing self-observations
Standing and balance— directions of the spine, orientation Movement—
Gather Clouds, proximity, subtle perceptions, touch Group Share

10:45-11:15 am Break

11:00-12:30 pm Theater Exercises:

Milling and Seeding, Walking solo Synching in silence, Mirroring Writing observations
Group Share

12:30-1:30 pm Lunch

1:30-1:45 pm Question & Discussion

1:45-3:00 pm Walking with Idioms

Emotion Poses
Sculptures and nonverbal stories Sculpture Garden
Writing observations
Group Share

3:00-3:30 pm Break

3:30-4:30 pm Proximity walk

Gestures and Gibberish, Voice and Synchrony Still face
Writing observations
Group Share

4:30-5:00 pm Closing

Questions & Discussion
Vocalizing and Toning— Sound bath

Deirdre Fay, LICSW ( 3 Days )

Embodied Attachment

Practical Maps & Strategies To Create A Felt Sense Of Safety

Seminar Description

One of the main reasons post-traumatic stress disorder doesn’t resolve is due to the underlying, unresolved attachment issues. Our bodies, minds, and hearts are wired to connect. When connection(s) are broken or betrayed, especially while growing up, the internal patterns become disorganized, remaining that way despite how one appears externally.

Research indicates that one in four people has a secure attachment style. Which means that the rest, three out of four, have variations on the insecure attachment styles. While that sounds daunting the good news is attachment patterns can be transformed. To do this we need to not only have cognitive understanding of attachment patterns but more importantly, know how to deal with the non-narrative imprinting that happens before the brain is fully formed.

The Becoming Safely Embodied Skills are designed to teach simple, practical, concrete ways to organize a person’s disorganized inner world. Having these key foundations in place a person can then untangle the myriad relational layers that get confused when not securely attached.

This experiential workshop will be designed to give you the theory in an easy to understand way. More importantly you’ll learn strategies and practices to use with your clients the day you return to work.

Seminar Outline

Using the Becoming Safely Embodied Skills to Organize the Disorganized Inner World

  • Learn the difference between a thought, feeling, and body sensation
  • Untangle the color commentary from what’s really going on
  • De-construct triggers
  • Train the mind/body/heart to live in the present moment

How attachment patterns are imprinted

  • Different developmental memory systems
  • Internal Working Model (Bowlby)
  • Patterns replicated over time (research)
  • Secure Base / Secure Haven
  • Parallel Paths
  • Triggered responses

Identifying Embodied Movements of Attachment

  • Universal infant body movements
  • Movement patterns that keep a person stuck
  • Practical body-centered methods to shift stuck, entrenched patterns

Explore Six Foundations of Embodied Attachment

  • Developmental needs of Child vs Adult
  • Most hated emotional experience for those with attachment issues
  • Attachment Crucible
  • Attachment Mirror
  • Navigating Turbulence

Demystifying therapeutic impasses in attachment therapy

  • How to access the non-narrative communications through the therapeutic relationship
  • Intersubjective Matrix (Stern)
  • Healing possibilities
  • Post Traumatic Growth & Resilience

Clinical Applications of Body-oriented therapies, including clinically appropriate yoga and meditation

  • Foundational skills
  • Grounding in the spine
  • Linking new patterns to shift old patterns
  • Embodying Nourishing Opposites

Learning Objectives

  1. Explain how attachment patterns are non-narrative, encoded as an Internal Working Model
  2. Identify the Six Foundational Functions of Secure Attachment
  3. Describe and apply strategies to move from protest to Nourishing Opposites
  4. Learn a step-by-step map to change attachment patterns
  5. Explain our evolutionary negativity bias and how to cultivate an embodied positivity bias
  6. Embed new neural pathways with simple embodied approaches
  7. Cultivate a transformational approach to PTSD

 

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Bio: Deirdre Fay, LICSW

Deirdre Fay, LICSW has decades of experience exploring the intersection of trauma, attachment, yoga and meditation. Having meditated since the 70’s and lived in a yoga ashram for six years in the 80’s and 90s Deirdre brings a unique perspective to being in the body.  In the 90’s Deirdre was asked to teach yoga and meditation to those on the dissociative unit at McLean Hospital.  Having amassed skill sets in trauma treatment (as a supervisor under the guidance of Bessel van der Kolk at the Trauma Center), attachment theory (13 years of training with Daniel Brown), body therapy (as a trainer in Sensorimotor Psychotherapy) Deirdre now teaches an integrative approach which Chris Germer calls “a radically positive approach to healing trauma.”  Deirdre founded the Becoming Safely Embodied skills groups and is the author of Attachment-Based Yoga & Meditation for Trauma Recovery (W.W. Norton, 2017), Becoming Safely Embodied Skills Manual (2007), and co-author of Attachment Disturbances for Adults (W.W. Norton, 2016) as well as the co-author of chapters in Neurobiological Treatments of Traumatic Dissociation.

Kathy Steele ( 2 Days )

An Integrative Approach to Treating Complex PTSD

and Dissociative Disorders

Kathy Steele, MN, CS

This two day workshop will offer an integrative approach to creating safety, reduce and resolve symptoms, and stabilize clients who have complex PTSD and dissociative disorders. Many clients with complex trauma are challenging, with a high level of crisis and chaos, problems with the therapeutic relationship, and entrenched dysfunctional coping patterns. We will first examine how to understand and plan these demanding treatments in a sequenced, rational and tailored manner that supports increasing integration and improved functioning. Next, we will focus on specific principles and prognostic factors that can guide therapists in thoughtfully choosing interventions that are most likely to be effective. Interventions will be drawn from a variety of top-down and bottom-up modalities that are based upon a coherent theoretical foundation. Participants will explore how to work with attachment problems such as dependency, rage, need, shame, and isolation, and will learn specific interventions to facilitate a collaborative therapeutic relationship. We will explore when and how to approach traumatic memory in the context of the therapeutic relationship. Emphasis will be place on how to work with various degrees of dissociation. A sequenced and systemic approach to dissociation will be discussed, with highly practical interventions. Participants will also explore the concept of resistance and how it can best be addressed in a collaborative manner with highly traumatized clients.

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to:

  1. Name five essential principles of treatment in working with Complex PTSD and dissociative disorders.
  2. Discuss the differences between a parent-child model and a collaborative model of the therapeutic relationship, and list at least 3 ways a collaborative relationship can be estabilished.
  3. Define disorganized attachment and how it is associative with dissociation.
  4. Define dissociation and name at least four ways to work with clients who have dissociative disorders.
  5. List contraindications to working with traumatic memory.
  6. Employ at least five different interventions to support integration of traumatic memory.

 

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Who is Kathy Steele ?

Kathy Steele, MN, CS has been in private practice in Atlanta, Georgia, USA for over three decades and is also an Adjunct Faculty at Emory University. She is a Fellow and past President of the International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation (ISSTD), and is the recipient of a number of awards for her clinical and published works, including the 2010 Lifetime Achievement Award from ISSTD. She has numerous publications in the field of trauma and dissociation, including three books. Kathy is known for her humor, compassion, respect, and depth of knowledge as a clinician and teacher, and for her capacity to present complex issues in easily understood and clear ways.

Dr Dan Siegel ( 2 Days )

Developmental Trauma

An Interpersonal Neurobiological Approach to Transforming Developmental Trauma Into Integration & Resiliency 

IMPORTANT NOTICE 15/05/2017

Manual registration will be open from 8:30 on Tuesday 16th of May at The Rochestown Park Hotel. The Seminar will commence at 9:30am . We have emailed all attendees with a link to check-in online so please refer to same and follow instructions to avoid manual registration and any possible delays on the day. Please refer to a number of email communications sent to attendees over the last 10 days from PCPSI which will have further information on the two day event.

 

 

In this workshop, we will explore trauma resolution from an Interpersonal Neurobiology perspective, looking at how early life experiences and relationships interact with the nervous system and the developing mind to shape who we become. By establishing a working definition of the mind, using the foundational concept of integration – the differentiation and linkage of parts of a system, we can begin to conceptualize trauma through an Interpersonal Neurobiology lens and explore how we can best help our clients resolve trauma, increase integration, and move towards health, well-being, and resiliency.

“Mind” is a term that lacks a definition in a range of fields of academics as well as in education, parenting, and even mental health.  Beyond common descriptions of mental activities, such as emotion, memory and thought, defining the mind itself empowers us to ask what a healthy mind might be, and what we can do to cultivate a healthy mind in our individual and collective lives.

This definition of Mind will serve as a foundation as we dive deeply into the topic of trauma, exploring how traumatic experiences – or experiences that overwhelm our ability to cope well – affect our nervous system, relationships, and subjective experiences and how integration is key to trauma resolution. We will take a critical look at the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study (ACES) and an in-depth view of attachment science to explore how people adapt to traumatic experiences and how trauma creates barriers to integration, such as impaired neural development, insecure attachment tendencies, and non-coherent narratives.

Using the 9 Domains of Integration, which include integration of consciousness, the nervous system, relationships, internal states, time, and memory, we can identify areas in which clients may be lacking integration, which manifests through states of rigidity, chaos, or both, due to past developmental traumas. Through this thorough understanding of Interpersonal Neurobiology, integration, and trauma, treatment planning and intervention can then be built around increasing differentiation and linkage of specific areas within the client’s life to build new neural pathways, support the creation of coherent narratives, and create rewarding relationships as trauma is resolved.

Come join us on a journey into the nature of mind as we explore trauma resolution, neuroplasticity, and the power of integration to create well-being in the lives of our patients and our own lives.

The workshop includes 

  • A review of current research on the mind, brain, and relationships
  • Discussions about neuroplasticity:  How brain structure is shaped by experience
  • In depth look at developmental trauma from an IPNB perspective
  • Specific techniques that promote integration and improve affect regulation, the coherence of the self, and the quality of interpersonal relationships.
  • Experiential exercises, including guided meditation and mindful movement.

Learning outcomes:

Participants in the workshop will be able to…

  • Describe nine domains of integration
  • Define trauma and describe how it affects the brain, relationships, and the mind
  • Name four ways the brain changes in response to experience
  • Outline how traumatic experiences are uniquely stored in memory and ways in which those memories can become integrated with trauma resolution
  • Name three applications of attachment theory in assessment of developmental trauma
  • Identify chaotic and rigid states as examples of impaired integration and well-being
  • Define the mind and outline how mind is different from brain
  • Outline four ways in which quantum physics may be relevant for understanding mind as an emergent property of energy flow
  • Discuss the nature of time and how an “arrow of time” may be present in some facets of mind but absent in others

 

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Daniel J. Siegel, M.D

Daniel J. Siegel, M.D., received his medical degree from Harvard University and completed his postgraduate medical education at UCLA with training in pediatrics and child, adolescent and adult psychiatry.  He served as a National Institute of Mental Health Research Fellow at UCLA, studying family interactions with an emphasis on how attachment experiences influence emotions, behavior, autobiographical memory and narrative.

Dr. Siegel is a clinical professor of psychiatry at the UCLA School of Medicine and the founding co-director of the Mindful Awareness Research Center at UCLA. An award-winning educator, he is a Distinguished Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association and recipient of several honorary fellowships. Dr. Siegel is also the Executive Director of the Mindsight Institute, an educational organization which offers online learning and in-person lectures that focus on how the development of mindsight in individuals, families and communities can be enhanced by examining the interface of human relationships and basic biological processes. His psychotherapy practice includes children, adolescents, adults, couples, and families. He serves as the Medical Director of the LifeSpan Learning Institute and on the Advisory Board of the Blue School in New York City, which has built its curriculum around Dr. Siegel’s Mindsight approach.

Dr. Siegel has published extensively for the professional audience.  He is the author of numerous articles, chapters, and the internationally acclaimed text, The Developing Mind: How Relationships and the Brain Interact to Shape Who We Are (Second Edition, Guilford, 2012).  This book introduces the field of interpersonal neurobiology, and has been utilized by a number of clinical and research organizations worldwide. Dr. Siegel serves as the Founding Editor for the Norton Professional Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology which contains over fifty textbooks.  The Mindful Brain: Reflection and Attunement in the Cultivation of Well-Being (Norton, 2007) explores the nature of mindful awareness as a process that harnesses the social circuitry of the brain as it promotes mental, physical, and relational health. The Mindful Therapist: A Clinician’s Guide to Mindsight and Neural Integration (Norton, 2010), explores the application of a range of techniques for the clinician’s own development, as well as their clients’ development of mindsight and neural integration. Pocket Guide to Interpersonal Neurobiology: An Integrative Handbook of the Mind (Norton, 2012), explores how to apply the interpersonal neurobiology approach to developing a healthy mind, an integrated brain, and empathic relationships. His most recent book is Mind: A Journey to the Heart of Being Human (Norton, 2017), which offers a deep exploration of our mental lives as they emerge from the body and our relations to each other and the world around us. Dr. Siegel’s publications for professionals and the public have been translated into over thirty languages.

Dr. Siegel’s book, Mindsight: The New Science of Personal Transformation (Bantam, 2010), offers the general reader an in-depth exploration of the power of the mind to integrate the brain and promote well-being. He has written four parenting books, including the three New York Times bestsellers Brainstorm: The Power and Purpose of the Teenage Brain (Tarcher/Penguin, 2013); The Whole-Brain Child: 12 Revolutionary Strategies to Nurture Your Child’s Developing Mind (Random House, 2011) and No-Drama Discipline: The Whole-Brain Way to Calm the Chaos and Nurture Your Child’s Developing Mind (Bantam, 2014), both with Tina Payne Bryson, Ph.D., and Parenting from the Inside Out: How a Deeper Self-Understanding Can Help You Raise Children Who Thrive (Tarcher/Penguin, 2003) with Mary Hartzell, M.Ed.

Dr. Siegel’s unique ability to make complicated scientific concepts exciting has led him to be invited to address diverse local, national and international groups of mental health professionals, neuroscientists, corporate leaders, educators, parents, public administrators, healthcare providers, policy-makers, mediators, judges, and clergy. He has lectured for the King of Thailand, Pope John Paul II, His Holiness the Dalai Lama, Google University, and London’s Royal Society of Arts (RSA). He lives in Southern California with his family.

 

Lisa Ferentz ( 2 Days )

Trauma, Attachment, Affect Dysregulation and Shame:

Treating the Seeds and the Cycle of Self-Destructive Behaviours

Many clients with insecure or disorganized attachment issues, histories of prior trauma, abuse or neglect, or overwhelming developmental stressors often lack the ability to engage in appropriate affect regulation.  As a result, they are vulnerable to turning to self-destructive strategies including: acts of self-mutilation; substance abuse and other addictions; and eating disordered behaviors to cope and self-soothe.  Although these behaviors provide limited relief in the short-term, they inevitably lead to guilt, shame, and more traumatization, increasing the likelihood of chronic self-harm.  Join Lisa Ferentz, expert trauma therapist, and master the ability to decode and unpack the pain and the shame your clients experience while safely delving deeper into the source of their trauma and self-destructive behaviors.

As we explore the relationship between trauma, affect dysregulation, and self-harm, you’ll learn how triggering events, negative cognitions and affect, and dissociation fuel their chronic and cyclical nature. Lisa will teach you her proven approach that incorporates psycho-education, reparative attachment work, and expressive modalities that give your clients new, healthier coping strategies that replace their long-standing addictive and self-harming behaviors.  Her strengths-based, de-pathologized approach is designed to increase internal and external safety, promote grounding and containment, reduce flashbacks and help clients heal their pain narratives.

Working with a specific “cycle of self-destructive behaviors” will also provide you with a concrete template for a variety of creative and effective treatment strategies designed to reduce and eventually extinguish the behaviors. We will explore the idea of “working with” self-destructive behaviors by de-coding their deeper meaning and purpose while learning how to avoid the power struggles and increased self-harm that often accompanies ineffective “safety contracts.”  A more effective, alternative contract, called CARESS, will be presented. This intervention will help your clients reduce their shame and self-blame narratives, communicate their pain in healthier ways, short-circuit overwhelming thoughts and feelings, and re-claim affect regulation skills.  Clinical case examples, videos, clients’ writings and artwork will be incorporated into the workshop, and you will have the opportunity to safely “try on” expressive modalities including drawing, writing, guided imagery, somatic resourcing and breath work.

Learning Objectives:

1. Explain the relationship between, trauma, attachment, developmental stressors, affect dysregulation, shame, and self destructive acts.

2. Describe a chronic cycle of self-harm and the ways in which dissociation and anxiety influence the process.

3. Describe and utilize CARESS, an alternative to standard safety contracts.

4. Implement at least 5 creative strategies that help re-ground and re-establish a sense of safety in triggered trauma survivors.

5.Identify the recurring themes in the artwork of traumatized clients and learn how to work with art in session.

6. Describe the impact of counter-transference when working with self-destructive behaviors.

(Here is a more detailed outline of the workshop, if you need it)

1) Exploring the connection between attachment and affect regulation

– the four attachment styles and their impact on child development

-the challenge of attaching to unavailable, addicted, or abusive caretakers

-living in a state of affect dysregulation and the impact of hypo- and hyper-arousal

-exploring the dynamics of attachment and affect regulation through videos

2) Working with the strengths-based perspective

-the advantages to de-pathologizing destructive behaviors

-the impact this paradigm has on the therapeutic relationship

3) Understanding trauma-re-enactment and the meta-communication of self-harm

-“telling “ without talking

-why acts of self-harm are not arbitrary

-why your clients hurt themselves

4) The cycle of self-destructive behaviors

-what sets the behavior in motion, why it escalates and what reinforces it

5) Creative interventions to manage and eventually extinguish self-destructive acts

-journaling to understand triggers

-re-framing cognitive distortions

-using guided imagery for untenable thoughts and feelings

-safe place imagery and containment

-the power of incorporating breath work

-using the body for somatic resourcing and grounding

-short-circuiting flashbacks and dissociation

6) Why standard safety contracts don’t work and what to do instead

-incorporating CARESS and eliminating the power struggles in treatment

-processing clients’ artwork

7) The impact of counter-transference on the work

 

 

 

 

Lisa Ferentz, MSW, LCSW-C, DAPA

Lisa is a recognized expert in the strengths-based, de-pathologized treatment of trauma and has been in private practice for 32 years.  She presents workshops and keynote addresses nationally and internationally, and is a clinical consultant to practitioners and mental health agencies in the United States, Canada and the UK.  She has been an Adjunct Faculty member at several Universities, and is the Founder of “The Institute for Advanced Psychotherapy Training and Education,” now going into its tenth year of providing continuing education to mental health professionals and graduating over 800 clinicians from her two Certificate Programs in Advanced Trauma Treatment.  In 2009 she was voted the “Social Worker of Year” by the Maryland Society for Clinical Social Work.  Lisa is the author of “Treating Self-Destructive Behaviors in Traumatized Clients: A Clinician’s Guide,” now in its second edition, and “Letting Go of Self-Destructive Behaviors: A Workbook of Hope and Healing.”  Her next book, “Be Afraid. Do it Anyway: And Other Lessons to Live By” will be out early in 2017.  Lisa also hosted a weekly radio talk show, writes blogs and articles for websites on self-harm and self-care, teaches on many webinars, and is weekly contributor to Psychologytoday.com.  You can follow Lisa’s work at www.lisaferentz.com, Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter.

 

 

Dr Janina Fisher ( 3 Days )

Trauma-Informed Stabilisation Treatment

Substance Abuse, Eating Disorders, Compulsive Self-Harm, and Dissociative Symptoms 

Childhood trauma, neglect, and abandonment leave clients with overwhelmingly painful emotions and a compromised nervous system that impairs their capacity to tolerate everyday life, much less trauma-related activation. Unaware that their intense reactions are driven by nonverbal traumatic memories lodged in the body, they resort to desperate measures to manage the overwhelm.  Research shows that a history of trauma tends to be associated with self-harm, suicidality, eating disorders, addictive behavior and substance abuse, numbing and disconnection, and dissociative splitting or fragmentation. Traditional methods of treating these issues, whether in hospital, residential, or outpatient settings, have historically not addressed the underlying trauma and have generally been only moderately effective with issues of safety.

TIST or Trauma-Informed Stabilization Treatment was developed to provide a trauma-informed approach to the challenges of treating self-destructive and dissociative symptoms. Based on theoretical principles drawn from the neuroscience research on trauma and structural dissociation, TIST offers a treatment approach that integrates mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, Sensorimotor Psychotherapy, ego state techniques, and Internal Family Systems. It has been used successfully to address the challenges of treating individuals with diagnoses of complex PTSD, borderline personality, bipolar disorder, addictive and eating disorders, and dissociative disorders. Because it contextualizes self-destructive behavior as trauma-related, patients feel less pathologized and more validated, increasing their motivation to overcome self-destructive impulses as a step toward overcoming past experiences of betrayal and victimization.

Learning Objectives:

Participants will be able to:

    • describe the neurobiological effects of traumatic experience
    • discuss the relationship between autonomic arousal and addictive behavior
    • utilize the Abstinence/Relapse Cycle to educate and motivate addictive clients
    • identify interventions that regulate autonomic arousal and support sobriety
    • employ concepts and techniques drawn from Sensorimotor Psychotherapy and Internal Family Systems
    • identify animal defense survival responses as they manifest as symptoms in traumatised clients
    • describe how splitting and compartmentalization enhance survival from trauma
    • discuss the use of the structural dissociation model with clients
    • utilize mindfulness-based language and interventions with structurally dissociated clients
    • implement stabilization techniques drawn from Internal Family Systems
    • improve client ability for self-compassion and self-acceptance
    • increase internal sense of safety by using the social engagement system

 

THIS IS A THREE DAY SEMINAR WITH LUNCH PROVIDED ON EACH DAY

 

Janina Fisher, Ph.D.

Dr Fisher is a licensed Clinical Psychologist and Instructor at the Trauma Centre, an outpatient clinic and research centre founded by Bessel van der Kolk.  Known for her expertise as both a clinician and consultant, she is also Assistant Director of the Sensorimotor Psychotherapy Institute, an EMDR International Association Credit Provider,  Psychological Services Director, Khiron Clinics UK, past president of the New England Society for the Treatment of Trauma and Dissociation, and a former Instructor, Harvard Medical School.  Dr. Fisher lectures and teaches nationally and internationally on topics related to the integration of the neurobiological research and newer trauma treatment paradigms into traditional therapeutic modalities.   She is the author of Psychoeducational Aids for Treating Psychological Trauma, co-author of Sensorimotor Psychotherapy: Interventions for Trauma and Dissociation, and author of the forthcoming book, Healing the Fragmented Selves of Trauma Survivors: Overcoming Internal Self-Alienation.

Published and Unpublished Articles

  • “Putting the Pieces Together: 25 Years of Learning Trauma Treatment” | Download PDF
    Published in Psychotherapy Networker, May/June 2014.
  • “The Treatment of Structural Dissociation in Chronically Traumatized Patients” | Download PDF
    Published in In Anstorp & Benum (2014). Trauma treatment in practice: complex trauma and dissociation. Oslo: Universitetsforlaget.
  • “Sensorimotor Approaches to Trauma Treatment” | Download PDF
    Published in Advances in Psychiatric Treatment, July 2011.
  • “Attachment as a Sensorimotor Experience” | Download PDF
    Published in Attachement: New Directions in Psychotherapy and Relational Psychoanalysis, July, 2011.
  • “Retraining the Brain: Harnessing Our Neuralplasticity” | Download PDF
    Published in the Psychotherapy Networker, March, 2011.
  • “Brain to Brain: The Therapist as Neurobiological Regulator” | Download PDF
    Published in the Psychotherapy Networker, January, 2010.
  • “Working with the Neurobiological Legacy of Trauma” (unpublished paper) | Download PDF
  • “Addictions and Trauma Recovery” (unpublished paper) | Download PDF
  • “Stabilization in the Treatment of Trauma” (unpublished paper) | Download PDF
  • “Self-harm and Suicidality” (unpublished paper) | Download PDF
  • “Dissociative Phenomena in the Everyday Lives of Trauma Survivors” | Download PDF
  • “Adapting EMDR Techniques in the Treatment of Dissociative or Dysregulated Clients” (unpublished paper) | Download PDF
  • “Modified EMDR Resource Development Protocol” (unpublished paper) | Download PDF

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